Hyperhidrosis – ‘The body of water’

What is Hyperhidrosis?

Hyperhidrosis describes a condition when the sympathetic nervous system along with sweat glands throughout the body are over-active. As a result the hands, head, feet and sometimes entire body can sweat very easily and in some cases constantly.

Human beings sweat. When we’re hot, nervous or have been exercising it’s part of the body’s natural cooling system and when we’re stressed our bodies heat up as adrenalin pumps through our system preparing us for flight or fight mode. For most of the population this is something that just happens and whilst it may sometimes be unpleasant it passes and is soon forgotten.

Meanwhile for some, sweating is excessive and can be a constant and uncomfortable experience. At this level it is often diagnosed as hyperhidrosis. There are many products now on the market and whilst Botox has become quite widely used there are also a new generation of pharmaceuticals that apparently control how water in the body is released. Another more drastic action is a major operation known as a sympathectomy. This severs the nerves that are responsible for making the hands sweat and can be effective but may also have quite drastic and lasting side effects. These can include excessive sweating elsewhere throughout the body, eyelid drooping as well as going through the trauma of the operation and it simply not working. Whilst there is much more understanding about this condition compared to 20 years ago many people with hyperhidrosis are often desperate for a way out of their sweating experience and so may be at the mercy of some quite harmful interventions that could still be in their infancy and understanding around long-term use etc.

For those who sweat moderately it may be difficult to appreciate how difficult the experience of excessive sweating can be. For many individuals hyperhidrosis can be embarrassing and create a constant sense of self-consciousness resulting in anxiety, shame, depression and social withdrawal.

You may have a friend or family member who might have mentioned something about their sweating and perhaps you noticed what they were talking about but most of the time you probably wondered what all the fuss was about. However, for those who experience it there is often an ever present anxiety around – going into hot rooms, which clothes to wear, unease at being touched or having to shake someone’s hand etc. Hyperhidrosis can lead to social anxiety and isolation and because most people who suffer from it often feel misunderstood by those around them or feel they have to hide the condition it can be a very lonely experience.

There is much more awareness of hyperhidrosis today with support groups springing up as well more varied treatments available. Connecting to others with the condition is a good way to feel supported and understood. One such network group is http://www.hyperhidrosisuk.org run by a dedicated and hard working group of volunteers.

My story

Having experienced hyperhydrosis from a young age I later opted for a sympathectomy and underwent the trauma of this major operation. The good news is it worked but whilst my hands stopped sweating to the extent they used to the rest of my body went into overdrive. This is the side-effect I’ve learned to live with and through my re-training as a psychotherapist I’ve explored within myself what might have been the caused. I’ve concluded that there are no clear answers to this query but the exploration has lead me towards how the body deals with trauma as one possible explanation. Could it be that at some point in our early life something within the sympathetic nervous system was switched on through some impactfull experience and has not been switched off? This, though, may not explain hereditary influences. An example of this is a colleague of mine with hyperhidrosis who noticed that, after a couple of months of having a baby, her son’s hands were sweating suggesting he may have inherited it from her. The one thing I have come to learn is that at this point in time we just don’t know the definitive cause. For me, the attention has to be in the reality of the present moment and how I can maintain a constructive attitude to both my body and the condition.

How can counselling help?

Counselling can’t offer a way to stop the sweating but it can provide a space in which to discuss the shame, anxiety and stress that is experienced as a result. It can also help build a better relationship with our body where excessive sweating can lead to feeling disappointed with it and generally out of control. Counselling may also help us learn from our experience rather than remaining stuck in a cycle of avoidance and stress where we may feel at war with our bodies and as such with the condition.

Our bodies are approximately 70% water. With hyperhidrosis water leaks from the body through our skin. Our bodies can’t help it and learning to be kind to ourselves and our bodies regardless of the flaws is an important step towards coping with hyperhidrosis or any other uncomfortable condition for that matter.

Acceptance and tolerance is the key so that whatever decisions we make, whether its taking medication, having an operation or leaving the medical profession out of it. From a place of insight and love for ourselves we must make informed decisions and learn how to act with discomfort rather than react against it which only results in stress and anxiety. Mindfulness may be a helpful tool and I’ve found Jon Kabat Zinn’s book ‘Full catastrophe living’ very helpful.

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7 thoughts on “Hyperhidrosis – ‘The body of water’

    • Hi – thanks for your response. Would love to hear more
      about your experience, thoughts etc. I know from my
      own experience that no one in my family reported having
      had hyperhydrosis but that may be a generational thing
      in terms of my grandparent’s generation may not have
      spoken openly about such things…

  1. My husband definitely had it, he had three showers prior to our first date! And my son, definitely has it, has to have two showers a day when nervous. Even my daughter has sweaty palms when anxious. Not sure about the next generation back. They worked outdoors anyway, and sweat would have been part of their life. I, on the other hand, rarely ever sweat, and the third of my children, follow me genetically, it seems.

    • Yes, it’s interesting how it seems to have been passed on through your husband. Also interesting how reports of the condition are on the increase – could this be, not only due to more awareness, but also more and more of us are moving to the cities and less of us working outdoors and connecting to nature where sweating may be less of an issue? Having said that if your hands sweat handling tools etc is still a challenge. How are your children about their condition and have they had any treatments?

      • Body Odour can be a bit of a problem in summer with my son, sweating so much. So he has to have several showers a day. It does seem to coincide heavily with stress and anxiety in his case. ( and less so with my daughter) She does not know what if anything is stressing her. But it is not nearly as much of a problem as my son’s condition.

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